Category: Court Practice

QC v JC: Junior Bar Privilege, 1836-1912

From the Cork Examiner, 17 March 1864:

“CORK SPRING ASSIZES (before Mr Justice Keogh) – BAR PRIVILEGE

Mary Sullivan was indicted for stealing a letter from the Post-office.

Mr Coffey defended the prisoner.  Messrs Clarke QC and Brereton QC, instructed by the Post-office department, prosecuted.

Mr Coffey said that he wished to know if the prosecutors were going to proceed with the case in the absence of junior counsel.

Mr Brereton – We are directed by the Attorney –General to prosecute.

Mr read more

A Pleading Two-Step, Part 2: The Proper Business of the Junior Bar, 1856-64

From the Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent, Saturday 8 March 1856:

IMPORTANT – BAR PRACTICE

Judge Ball having during the day proceeded to settle issues in records to be tried in Cork at the ensuing assizes, and Mr Brereton, QC, having appeared for one of the parties, Mr John Leahy interrupted the learned gentleman, and said that as the senior of the junior bar in court, he had been requested to object to a Queen’s counsel acting in the settlement of issues without a junior with read more

A Pleading Two-Step, Part 1: The Dangers of Dispensing With Counsel, 1866

From the Evening Freeman, 28 July 1866 and the Cork Constitution, 30 July 1866:

Mr Hardy applied to have the defence filed in the case of Tedcastle v Stockholme set aside on the ground that it was informal and embarrassing.

Mr O’Driscoll said he held a brief for the defendant, but he would save much trouble by stating that the defence was not maintainable.  It was framed in the old style and pleaded the general issues.

Mr Justice Keogh – Who prepared it?

Mr O’Driscoll – It read more