Sandymount Lady Sues English Lieutenant for Breach of Promise, 1920

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From the Dublin Evening Telegraph, 31 March 1920:

“A WAR-TIME COURTSHIP”

Today in the King’s Bench Division, before Mr Justice Dodd, in the action of Sarah Reynolds, of 41 Londonbridge Road, Sandymount, Dublin, v Wm B Huskisson, Mr CS Campbell (instructed by Mr DA Quaid) applied for an order giving leave to issue and serve a writ out of the jurisdiction. The cause of action was breach of promise of marriage.

Counsel moved on the affidavit of the plaintiff, who stated that the read more

More on the Milltown Outrage, 1861

I previously posted a short video about the Milltown Outrage, which occurred in Dublin in September 1861. It involved an attack on a 19-year-old governess by the cab driver engaged to bring her home from Sackville (now O’Connell) Street to Rathgar.

At the end of the video it was disclosed that an arrest had subsequently been made. The name of the man arrested was John Curran. Unusually for the perpetrator in a 19th century Dublin criminal read more

Not Putting a Ring on it, 1937

From the Irish Examiner, 26 November 1937:

“JUDGE AND A RING

AMUSING CASE AT WEXFORD CIRCUIT COURT

QUESTIONS TO WITNESS

At Wexford Circuit Court, before Judge Comyn KC, William McC, Wexford, appealed against the decision of the District Court Justice at Wexford, sentencing him to a month’s imprisonment on a charge of larceny by finding of a gold ring the property of Mrs K Delaney, Gardiner’s Row, Dublin.

Mrs Delaney swore that on August 22nd, 1937, she was playing golf at the read more

A Bear in the Dock, 1875

From the Freeman’s Journal, 2 April 1875:

“A Bear in the Dock

Two Frenchmen were charged with causing an obstruction to the public thoroughfare at Pill-Lane, that morning, by exhibiting a dancing bear.

The prisoners were placed in the dock, with the bear between them. It was a shaggy, uncouth-looking animal, not at all like that which Goldsmith’s bear leader described as never dancing but to the genteelest music, ‘Water Parting,’ or the duet in ‘Ariadne.’

On read more

Aristocratic Insolence in the Dublin Police Court, 1830

Rutland Square, Dublin, c.1817, by William Frederick Brocas, via Mutual Art

From the Freeman’s Journal, 26 May 1830:

“DUBLIN POLICE

ARISTOCRATICAL INSOLENCE

‘A chiel’s amang ye takin notes

And faith he’ll prent it.’

Robert Burns

HENRY-STREET POLICE OFFICE, MONDAY.

Lord Langford attended before Mr Cole, the sitting magistrate at this office, to substantiate a complaint which he had previously preferred against James Carroll, a servant recently in his Lordship’s employment.

It appeared that Carroll had been for fifteen months in Lord Langford’s service; that read more

Mother of Bride Dies of Apoplexy as Officer Groom Exposed as Fraudster, 1857

From the Carlow Post, 1857:

An extraordinary case just occurred in Kingstown [now Dun Laoghaire] Police Court. It appears that a gentleman who recently held a commission in the 95th Foot was about to be married to a lady in that town. On passing through Birmingham, last week, he purchased jewellery to the value of about £45 or £50, and gave a draft on a London bank, in the name of Lord Charles Hay, and then proceeded to Ireland. The draft, on being presented in London, was declared read more

Mayo Courtship Ends in Substantial Award of Damages, 1925

From the Evening Herald (Dublin), 13 May 1925

“STRANGE WESTERN WOOING

FARMER WHO COURTED BY PROXY MULCTED FOR BREACH

COMPACT WITH PARENTS

LESSONS ON MELODEON AND A PAIR OF GLOVES

MARRIED ANOTHER

DEFENDANT UNASHAMED OF HIS CONDUCT

A farmer of 42 years, who sent emissaries to arrange a marriage with a girl half his age, figured as defendant in a breach of promise action in Ballina Circuit Court. He was ordered to pay £220 damages.  

One of the witnesses made the interesting statement that nine-tenths read more

Taken by the Fairies, 1840-1924

From the Freeman’s Journal, 2 February 1924:

“At a Special Court in Tullamore, before Mr Flanagan PC, Esther Smith, no fixed address, was remanded in custody on a charge of obtaining £3 and goods by false pretences and threats from Mary Murray, farmer’s wife, Moneyquid, Killeigh.

Mary Murray stated that Smith said one end of witness’s house was built on a ‘pass’ and that the other end of the house was the lucky end.  Accused said she was sent there by the ‘good people,’ read more

Derry Recorder Tests Lady’s Raincoat for Water Ingress, 1929

From the Derry Journal, 12 April 1929:

“TEST IN COURT

A LADY’S WATERPROOF

INTERESTING DERRY CASE

GARMENT RETURNED AFTER EIGHT MONTHS

A barrister, two solicitors, the Court Registrar and the Court Caretaker spent fifteen minutes in Derry Courthouse yesterday testing the quality of a waterproof coat, a garment which was much on view during the hearing of a claim for £2 by Mrs Johanna Quinn, of Redcliffe, Dunfield Terrace, Waterside, against Messrs. Goorwitch Ltd., for alleged breach of warranty.

Mr read more

Bride Arrested for Shoplifting on Eve of Wedding, 1826

From the Dublin Evening Post, 26 August 1826:

A young lady, moving in a respectable situation in life, was on Thursday committed to Newgate, Dublin, on a charge of shop-lifting.  The circumstances of this case are rather curious, and possess in some respect a melancholy interest.  This lady was to have been married on the very day that consigned her to disgrace and imprisonment, to an ignominious trial and punishment – for of her guilt, I fear, there is little doubt.  read more

Barrister’s Son Returns from the Dead, 1896

From the Cork Constitution, 5 March 1896:

“DUBLIN WEDNESDAY

To-day the Master of the Rolls had before him a case which brought to light a modern Enoch Arden. In 1866 William Henry Boyle, son of a well-known barrister, emigrated to America, leaving his young wife at home. Fortune did not smile on him, and he did not send for his wife. He ceased to write, and for many years his family had heard nothing of him, and at length assumed that he was dead. In this belief his wife married again, read more

The Man of Many Wives, 1884-1895

From the Illustrated London News, 14 June 1884:

“At the Dublin Commission Court, before Mr Justice Lawson, on Saturday, Brian Denis Molloy, son of a magistrate for the County of Mayo, and who, on the death of his father, will become entitled to £1000 per annum, was indicted for bigamy.  The prisoner has married five times, the last person with whom he went through the ceremony being his own first cousin, a lady of about forty, Miss Robertina Greene, who has an income in her read more

The Man Who Married His Mother-in-Law, 1904

From the Belfast Weekly News, 12 May 1904:

“The trial of James Thompson for having married his mother-in-law took place on 10th inst, in the Recorder’s Court, Dublin.  Mr Bushe KC, who prosecuted, stated the case for the Crown.  He said in 1896 the prisoner on 2nd June married a girl of the name of Tully.  She died in 1899, and he was once more free to marry.  But, of course, his wife being dead, he was not at liberty, under the law, to marry certain read more

Swallowing the Evidence, 1839

From the Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent, September 1839:

EXTRAORDINARY CASE- SWALLOWING A WATCH

A young gentleman, called Rathbane, charged Anne Lynch with having stolen his watch.

Complainant said he was passing through Marlborough Street when he was followed by the prisoner, who snatched the watch out of his waistcoat pocket.  He seized her on the spot, and had her given up to a policeman who was passing.  She was brought to the station-house, and although read more

Something Wicker This Way Comes: Laughter in Court at Child Noise Nuisance Case, 1853

From the Evening Freeman, 18 April 1853:

“CONSOLIDATED NISI PRIUS COURT – SATURDAY

Mangan v Tuthill

This was an appeal from a decree of St Sepulchre’s Court for £9.

Counsel for Mr Tuthill stated that his client lived in No 6 Rathmines Road, and the appellant in No 5; that his client had been greatly annoyed for several months by the appellant’s children, who were in the habit of rolling cars through the empty rooms of their house, which caused such a dreadful noise that his client would read more