A Barrister’s Mysterious Death, 1844

Mist on Moylussa Mountain, Lough Derg,’ by Grace Mary Trench, via Whytes

From the Tipperary Vindicator, October 1844:

J WALSH ESQ., BARRISTER-AT-LAW

It is with feelings of intense sorrow we announce the death of this gentleman. His loss is a public one. It is one which, we fear, it will be difficult to supply. The detail of his melancholy fate – having met death by drowning on Saturday – appear in another part of our columns. The learned and lamented gentleman had not been long attached to this circuit; but, short as was the time, we never read more

Midlands Circuit Judge Throws Himself Between Combatants to End Free Fight in Boyle Court, 1907

The old Courthouse, Boyle, Co Roscommon, via Buildings of Ireland

From the Evening Herald, 15 October 1907:

“While his Honor County Court Judge Wakely was revising the voters’ list in Boyle Courthouse yesterday a wild scene of tumult took place. George W Tully was after being examined in support of his claim for a vote, and on leaving the witness table he deliberately struck Arthur O’Connor two blows on the face with his clenched fist. Mr O’Connor retaliated, and a wild scene of riot ensued. The audience was composed of the supporters read more

British Soldiers Routed by Dublin Amazons, 1871

British soldiers in Dublin, from John F Finerty’s ‘Ireland in Pictures,‘ 1898

From the Freeman’s Journal, via the Western Mail, 11 September 1871:

During Tuesday last the locality of Pill Lane was considerably excited by a collision which occurred between a party of military and a number of the females gathered in the neighbourhood of the police courts. A soldier, absent without leave, was supposed to live in a house in the lane, and a picket of his regiment went in search of the fugitive. They attempted to enter the house, but were confronted by several read more

More on the Milltown Outrage, 1861

I previously posted a short video about the Milltown Outrage, which occurred in Dublin in September 1861. It involved an attack on a 19-year-old governess by the cab driver engaged to bring her home from Sackville (now O’Connell) Street to Rathgar.

At the end of the video it was disclosed that an arrest had subsequently been made. The name of the man arrested was John Curran. Unusually for the perpetrator in a 19th century Dublin criminal read more

Fawn-Smuggling on Inns Quay, 1838

From the Freeman’s Journal, 30 June 1838:

A man named John Cowan was brought before the magistrates on a charge of having stolen a fawn in the Phoenix Park, on the preceding day.

Police Constable 97D stated that he met the prisoner on the King’s Inns Quay, with a suspicious looking bundle under his coat; on searching him he found a live fawn concealed on his person.

The prisoner said he was returning from the review, with a number of other persons, and saw the fawn lying beneath read more

Newspaper-Reading in Court, 1867-1998


From the Irish Times, 22 November 1867:

“Sir – I was sitting in the court of Queen’s Bench yesterday, and while counsel was reading a long affidavit I applied myself to the columns of the Standard newspaper. Suddenly the Lord Chief Justice called out to me – ‘This is not a place for the public to read newspapers.’

I understood this as a prohibition, and of course desisted. But the question has since read more

Lord Chancellor’s Emissary Saves Lady from Singed Cat, Incurs Husband’s Wrath, 1838


From the Waterford Mail, 5 March 1838:

“There is a story running the rounds of the hundred and one coteries that assemble in the Four Courts, that is creating much amusement. You shall have it, and you may take it, as far as its authenticity is concerned, quantum valeat.

It appears that Sir Anthony Harte, the Lord read more

Scouts say ‘Great Scott’ as Irish Barrister Repeatedly Risks Life in Breathtaking Powerscourt Waterfall Rescues, 1942-44

From the Irish Independent, 4 August 1942:

Hundreds of picnickers watched, in tense excitement, while a Dublin holiday-maker balanced himself for three hours on a ledge 200 feet up the rocky side of the famous Powerscourt waterfall yesterday until he was rescued by a Dublin barrister who was camping in Powerscourt for the weekend.

The man, Charles Kenny, 41 Donnycarney Road, who had cycled to Enniskerry with friends, had endeavoured to climb up the side of the waterfall with a camera.  read more

Flags and the Four Courts, 1885-1922

The Prince and Princess of Wales’ 1885 visit to Dublin, as depicted in the Graphic, 18 April 1885. Perhaps because of its dirty condition, there were no depictions of the Four Courts among the many illustrations of the visit.

From the Dublin Daily Express, 17 April 1885:

“Sirs – The soiled flags which were displayed on the Four Courts during the Prince’s visit, and were a disgrace to the noble building, ought, I should think, receive a thoroughly good washing before being replaced on the return of his Royal Highness.

A line or two in your influential paper calling the attention of the authorities to the matter, would, I have no doubt, have the desired effect – I am, sir, yours &c

read more

The Milltown Outrage, 1861

A three minute video, the first of a two-parter about a long forgotten but once widely publicised crime of 1861 involving a Dublin cab driver, a 19-year old governess and an allegation of assault with intent to violate in the vicinity of what is now Alexandra College, Milltown.

There was a subsequent trial in the Commission Court, Green Street, involving multiple twists and turns and interesting issues regarding identification evidence. I hope to cover the trial and its aftermath in more detail read more