Month: May 2021

QC v JC: Junior Bar Privilege, 1836-1912

From the Cork Examiner, 17 March 1864:

“CORK SPRING ASSIZES (before Mr Justice Keogh) – BAR PRIVILEGE

Mary Sullivan was indicted for stealing a letter from the Post-office.

Mr Coffey defended the prisoner.  Messrs Clarke QC and Brereton QC, instructed by the Post-office department, prosecuted.

Mr Coffey said that he wished to know if the prosecutors were going to proceed with the case in the absence of junior counsel.

Mr Brereton – We are directed by the Attorney –General to prosecute.

Mr read more

Barrister’s Son Returns from the Dead, 1896

From the Cork Constitution, 5 March 1896:

“DUBLIN WEDNESDAY

To-day the Master of the Rolls had before him a case which brought to light a modern Enoch Arden. In 1866 William Henry Boyle, son of a well-known barrister, emigrated to America, leaving his young wife at home. Fortune did not smile on him, and he did not send for his wife. He ceased to write, and for many years his family had heard nothing of him, and at length assumed that he was dead. In this belief his wife married again, read more

In the Footsteps of Kings: Chancery Place, 1224-1916

Chancery Place, on the eastern side of the Four Courts, was originally a much narrower street known as Mass Lane.  The buildings on its western side sat close against the eastern wing of the Four Courts until they were demolished by the Commissioners of Public Works in the early 19th century. The above image from the 1840s shows Chancery Place following these changes and – aside from differences in vehicles, costume, and traffic regulation, and the replacement of the perimeter wall read more