Month: March 2021

The Bar Cricket Club in Season, 1889-1890

From the Clonmel Chronicle, 10 July 1880:

The members of the Bar of Ireland sometimes unbend the legal mind in the soft excitement of lawn tennis; but when they do, the learned gentlemen have their little frolic in ‘chamber’ as it were, and not in court.  They had what is called a ‘Lawn Tennis Tournament’ recently on the Earlsfort Terrace Rink, and a member of the Press went up to tell the public how it went on and off, but the notetaking chiel wasn’t admitted.  He says read more

Boys’ Night In Ends in Three Months’ Hard Labour for Elderly Barrister, 1892

From the Derry Journal, 8 June 1892:

At the Petty Sessions, Nenagh, Mr Sadleir Stoney, Barrister at Law and Justice of the Peace for Dublin, who resides at Ballycapple, between Nenagh and Cloughjordan, surrendered to heavy recognisances and was charged with having assaulted Mrs Alice Bunbury, wife of Captain Bunbury, in her own house at Woodville, about a mile and a half from the defendant’s residence.

Mr Stoney conducted his own defence.

Mrs Bunbury was examined.  She said she read more

The ‘Cleansing’ of Bull Lane, 1878

From the Freeman’s Journal, 1 March 1879:

During the past few months, quietly and unknown to the general public, a work has been in progress in Dublin calculated to materially benefit the city.  By a judicious use of the authority vested in them and a rigid exercise of their legal powers, the police have succeeded in thoroughly cleansing that den of infamy, a disgrace known as Bull-Lane. 

The existence of this moral plague spot has been for very many years a shame to civilisation read more

Future Supreme Court Judge Unsuccessfully Sued for Negligent Driving, 1924

From the Dublin Evening Telegraph, 4th and 5th March, 1924:

Miss May McConnon, a typist, residing at the Gaelic Hotel, Blackrock, Dundalk, claimed £3000 damages against Mr Cecil Lavery, barrister-at-law, for personal injuries caused, as alleged, by the negligence of the defendant in the management of a motor car near Dundalk.

The Plaintiff gave evidence, in which she stated that she was getting off her bicycle near Hearty’s cottages on the main road between Dublin and Dundalk, in order to read more

An Aggrieved Apprentice, 1874

From the Freeman’s Journal, 16 December 1874:

“To the Editor of the Freeman.

SIR – Would you kindly insert the following in the interest of the grievances of attorneys’ apprentices.  The facts are briefly these:- In the second week of last month a sessional examination was held at the Four Courts to test the knowledge of the apprentices who attended the professors of law lectures during the preceding year.  No official announcement of the result has yet been afforded, and read more

A Barrister’s Right to Walk Unobstructed, 1893

From the Cork Constitution, 17 April 1893:

“STRANGE CONDUCT OF AN IRISH BARRISTER

CHARGED BEFORE THE MAGISTRATES WITH STREET OBSTRUCTION

Mr William C Hennessy, barrister-at-law, Tralee, was charged by Constable John Foster with obstructing the footpath on the Grand Parade, at four o’clock on Friday evening.  Mr Hennessy had been arrested and remained in custody during Friday night.  He was not, however, asked to appear in the dock. 

Mr Hennessy applied for an adjournment, as read more

Ormond Quay Prison Break, 1784

From the Hibernian Journal; or, Chronicle of Liberty, 16 July 1784:

“Yesterday in the afternoon, a number of the prisoners, confined in the New Gaol, found means to break into the sewer that communicates from the prison to the Bradogue River, or water course that falls into the Liffey at Ormond Quay; several of them have been re-taken and conducted back to their old lodging, but better secured.  About sixteen it is thought are escaped; a guard is positioned at the mouths of the Bradogue, read more

A Princess Arrested in the Four Courts, 1864

Madame Laetitia Bonaparte Wyse, possibly wearing one of Mr Russell’s confections.

From the Waterford Mail, 17 February 1864:

SITTINGS AT NISI PRIUS

Wyse v Lewis

This was an action brought by Madame Letitia Bonaparte Wyse, widow of the late Thomas Wyse, formerly British ambassador at Greece, against Mr William Lewis, of Messrs Lewis and Howe, solicitors, of Nassau-street, in this city to recover damages for an alleged neglect by the defendant of the plaintiff’s business.  

The plaintiff is the cousin-german of the present Emperor of France, and daughter of Prince read more

Mr Dunn BL Back in Town, 1839-40

Professed beloved of Mr Dunn, Angela Burdett-Coutts, dressed for the theatre, which she loved.

From the Leeds Intelligencer, 29 December 1838:

“MR DUNN AGAIN AND MISS BURDETT COUTTS

At Bow-Street, on Monday, Miss Angelina Burdett-Coutts, accompanied by her father, Sir F Burdett, and attended by Mr Parkinson and Mr Humphries, solicitors, appeared before Sir F Roe to proffer a charge of annoying and insulting conduct against Mr Richard Dunn, an Irish barrister, whose ridiculous attempt to appear in the character of the lady’s suitor produced, on former occasions, no small share of annoyance read more

The Man Who Married His Mother-in-Law, 1904

From the Belfast Weekly News, 12 May 1904:

“The trial of James Thompson for having married his mother-in-law took place on 10th inst, in the Recorder’s Court, Dublin.  Mr Bushe KC, who prosecuted, stated the case for the Crown.  He said in 1896 the prisoner on 2nd June married a girl of the name of Tully.  She died in 1899, and he was once more free to marry.  But, of course, his wife being dead, he was not at liberty, under the law, to marry certain read more